October 27, 1986

American League awards [1986]



Roger Clemens had a record 20 strikeouts against the Mariners. Don Sutton won his 300th game. Bert Blyleven reached 3,000 strikeouts. Dave Righetti had a record 46 saves. Joe Cowley threw a no-hitter. Heisman Trophy winner Bo Jackson singled in his first at-bat.

Babe Ruth Award | Wade Boggs, Red Sox. 8 home runs, 71 RBIs, .357 batting average, .453 on-base percentage, .486 slugging percentage, 107 runs, 207 hits, 105 walks, 47 doubles. | A Real Rap Session

2. Roger Clemens, Red Sox
3. Don Mattingly, Yankees
4. Teddy Higuera, Brewers
5. Jesse Barfield, Blue Jays

Walter Johnson Award | Roger Clemens, Red Sox. 24-4, 2.48 ERA, 238 strikeouts and 67 walks in 254 innings, 10 complete games. Clemens had a record 20 strikeouts and no walks against the Mariners on April 29. | Striking Out Toward Cooperstown

Jackie Robinson Award | Mark Eichhorn, Blue Jays. 14-6, 1.72 ERA, 10 saves, 166 strikeouts and 45 walks in 157 innings. The Blue Jays invited Eichhorn to spring training, because they needed someone to throw batting practice.

2. Wally Joyner, Angels
3. Jose Canseco, Athletics

Connie Mack Award | Bobby Valentine, Rangers. 87-75 [.537] | Putting a Stop to a Long Slide

2. Pat Corrales, Cleveland
3. Gene Mauch, Angels



Catcher | Rich Gedman, Red Sox. 16 home runs, 65 RBIs, .258 batting average, .315 on-base percentage, .424 slugging percentage. Best fielder | Bob Boone, Angels.

First base | Don Mattingly, Yankees. 31 home runs, 113 RBIs, .352 batting average, .394 on-base percentage, .573 slugging percentage, 117 runs, 238 hits, 53 doubles. Best fielder | Mattingly | Mattingly Ends His Year Fittingly

Second base | Tony Bernazard, Cleveland. 17 home runs, 73 RBIs, .301 batting average, .362 on-base percentage, .456 slugging percentage. Best fielder | Frank White, Royals.

2. Lou Whitaker, Tigers

Third base | Wade Boggs, Red Sox. 8 home runs, 71 RBIs, .357 batting average, .453 on-base percentage, .486 slugging percentage, 107 runs, 207 hits, 105 walks, 47 doubles. 2. Gary Gaetti, Twins. Best fielder | Gaetti

Shortstop | Cal Ripken, Orioles. 25 home runs, 81 RBIs, .282 batting average, .355 on-base percentage, .461 slugging percentage, 35 doubles. 2. Alan Trammell, Tigers. Best fielder | Ripken

Left field | Jim Rice, Red Sox. 20 home runs, 110 RBIs, .324 batting average, .384 on-base percentage, .490 slugging percentage, 200 hits, 39 doubles.

Center field | Rickey Henderson, Yankees. 28 home runs, 74 RBIs, .263 batting average, .358 on-base percentage, .469 slugging percentage, 130 runs, 87 stolen bases. 2. Kirby Puckett, Twins. Best fielder | Gary Pettis, Angels.

Right field | Jesse Barfield, Blue Jays. 40 home runs, 108 RBIs, .289 batting average, .368 on-base percentage, .559 slugging percentage, 107 runs, 35 doubles. 2. Joe Carter, Cleveland.

Designated hitter | Larry Parrish, Rangers. 28 home runs, 94 RBIs, .276 batting average, .347 on-base percentage, .509 slugging percentage. 2. Don Baylor, Red Sox.



Starting rotation |

1. Roger Clemens, Red Sox
24-4, 2.48 ERA, 238 strikeouts and 67 walks in 254 innings, 10 complete games.

2. Teddy Higuera, Brewers. 20-11, 2.79 ERA, 207 strikeouts and 74 walks in 248.1 innings, 15 complete games. Fernando II. He is Mexican, he throws a screwball, and his middle name is Valenzuela. | Milwaukee Has Its Own Valenzuela

3. Mike Witt, Angels. 18-10, 2.84 ERA, 208 strikeouts and 73 walks in 269 innings, 14 complete games.

4. Jack Morris, Tigers. 21-8, 3.27 ERA, 223 strikeouts and 82 walks in 267 innings, 15 complete games, six shutouts.

5. Kirk McCaskill, Angels. 17-10, 3.36 ERA, 202 strikeouts and 92 walks in 246.1 innings, 10 complete games. 6. Tom Candiotti, Cleveland. 7. Bert Blyleven, Twins. 8. Bruce Hurst, Red Sox. 9. Jimmy Key, Blue Jays.

Reliever | Mark Eichhorn, Blue Jays. 14-6, 1.72 ERA, 10 saves, 166 strikeouts and 45 walks in 157 innings. 2. Dave Righetti, Yankees.
— Kevin Brewer

October 9, 1986

Joan Rivers never stopped

Joan Rivers was as relentless as her comedy. “I’ll show you fear,” Rivers says in the 2010 documentary A Piece of Work as she holds up an empty date book. “That’s fear. If my book ever looked like this, it would mean nobody wants me, that everything I ever tried to do in life didn’t work, nobody cared, and I’ve been totally forgotten.” That never happened, because she never stopped working.

Rivers hosted the long-running E! network’s Fashion Police and an online talk show In Bed with Joan, starred in the reality series Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? with her daughter and wrote Diary of a Mad Diva, which she promoted on more than a dozen talk shows — and that was this year alone. Her upcoming stand-up tour was to be called “Before They Close the Lid.” More than 20 dates were scheduled, including one at the Durham Performing Arts Center in November.

The indefatigable Rivers died Thursday. She was 81 years old.



On Feb. 17, 1965, when Rivers was 31 years old, she made her first appearance on The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson. She wore a black Jax dress, a string of pearls and a pink boa. She told jokes about being single and problems with her car. “God, you’re funny,” Carson said on the air. “You’re going to be a star.”

A month later, Rivers was the lead guest on the show and quickly became one of Carson’s favorites, making more than 50 appearances. In 1983, she became the first permanent guest host of The Tonight Show. Three years later, she signed a five-year, $15 million contract with the new Fox network to host her own show.

“The first person I called was Johnny Carson,” Rivers said in A Piece of Work. “He slammed the phone down. I called him again, and he slammed it down again and never spoke to me again — ever.”

Rivers told this story so often and with such conviction that it became accepted as truth, mostly because Carson never spoke of Rivers publicly, except for a few veiled references in his monologue, and partly because Rivers outlived him by nine years.

But Carson already knew of Rivers’ impending move when she made the call, according to King of the Night by Laurence Leamer. Her mistake, Carson felt, was in not telling him sooner. If she had, Carson might have wished her well on the air, as he had done with David Brenner and Alan Thicke and later with Pat Sajak and Arsenio Hall when they began their competing shows.

“I’m not taking her call,” Carson said. “It was a little late in arriving … about three months late.”

In the following months, Rivers tried to hire away some of Carson’s top personnel, including longtime producer Peter Lassally and a highly regarded talent coordinator. Carson gave them more money to stay.

The Late Show starring Joan Rivers premiered on Oct. 9, 1986 at 11 p.m., a half-hour before Carson. Her guests were David Lee Roth, Pee-wee Herman, Elton John and Cher. John, Cher and Rivers sang “The Bitch is Back.” Rivers beat Carson in the ratings in New York and San Francisco.



“The Fox show, even before we went on the air, was a nightmare,” Rivers said. Her husband, manager and executive producer, Edgar Rosenberg, constantly fought with Fox executives Rupert Murdoch and Barry Diller. When Rivers refused to fire her husband, Fox fired both of them. Her last show was on May 15, 1987.

Three months later, Rosenberg committed suicide. “He left me with no career and a lot of debt,” said Rivers, who became depressed and bulimic and contemplated suicide herself.

Then Rivers worked. She was the center square on Hollywood Squares (1987-89) and hosted a daytime talk show (1989-93) for which she won an Emmy. In 1994, she was nominated for a Tony Award for playing Lenny Bruce’s mother in Sally Marr … and Her Escorts. She wrote 12 books, including one about her many plastic surgeries. She peddled her own line of jewelry and clothing on QVC, selling more than $1 billion in merchandise. She was omnipresent on the red carpet of awards shows for E! and later the TV Guide Channel. She won Celebrity Apprentice.



On Jimmy Fallon’s first night as host of The Tonight Show in February, a series of celebrities made cameos, handing him $100 to settle a bet — Robert De Niro, Tina Fey, Seth Rogen, Stephen Colbert … and on and on. Among them was Rivers, making her first Tonight Show appearance since 1986.

A month later, she returned, making jokes about the Holocaust and vagina rings. Fallon held up a black and white photo of Carson and Rivers from that first appearance in 1965. “He said you’re going to be a star,” said Rivers, pointing at Carson in the photo. “It changed my life.”

October 7, 1986

National League awards [1986]



Pete Rose, 45, went 5-for-5 on Aug. 11, then retired a week later with 4,256 hits. Mike Scott threw a no-hitter on Sept. 25, the first to clinch a league or division title. The Mets won the NL East by a record 21.5 games. Bob Horner hit four home runs in a loss to the Expos.

Babe Ruth Award | Mike Scott, Astros. 18-10, 2.22 ERA, 306 strikeouts and 72 walks in 275.1 innings, five shutouts. Scott used his split-fingered fastball to lead the league in ERA, innings pitched, strikeouts, strikeouts per 9 innings [10.0] and fewest hits per 9 innings [5.9].

2. Mike Schmidt, Phillies
3. Tony Gwynn, Padres
4. Tim Raines, Expos

Walter Johnson Award | Mike Scott, Astros.

Jackie Robinson Award | Todd Worrell, Cardinals. 9-10, 2.08 ERA, 36 saves, 73 strikeouts and 41 walks in 103.2 innings.

2. Barry Bonds, Pirates
3. Robby Thompson, Giants

Pee Wee Reese Award | Keith Hernandez, Mets. 13 home runs, 83 RBIs, .310 batting average, .413 on-base percentage, .446 slugging percentage, 94 walks.

Connie Mack Award | Davey Johnson, Mets. 108-54 [.667]

2. Hal Lanier, Astros
3. Roger Craig, Giants



Catcher | Gary Carter, Mets. 24 home runs, 105 RBIs, .255 batting average, .337 on-base percentage, .439 slugging percentage. Best fielder | Jody Davis, Cubs.

First base | Keith Hernandez, Mets. 2. Von Hayes, Phillies. 3. Glenn Davis, Astros. Best fielder | Davis

Second base | Steve Sax, Dodgers. 6 home runs, 56 RBIs, .332 batting average, .390 on-base percentage, .441 slugging percentage, 210 hits, 43 doubles, 40 stolen bases. Best fielder | Ron Oester, Reds.

Third base | Mike Schmidt, Phillies. 37 home runs, 119 RBIs, .290 batting average, .390 on-base percentage, .547 slugging percentage. Best fielder | Terry Pendleton, Cardinals.

Shortstop | Ozzie Smith, Cardinals. 0 home run, 54 RBIs, .280 batting average, .376 on-base percentage, .333 slugging percentage, 31 stolen bases. Best fielder | Smith

Left field | Tim Raines, Expos. 9 home runs, 62 RBIs, .334 batting average, .413 on-base percentage, .476 slugging percentage, 35 doubles, 10 triples, 70 stolen bases.

Center field | Kevin McReynolds, Padres. 26 home runs, 96 RBIs, .288 batting average, .358 on-base percentage, .504 slugging percentage. 2. Lenny Dykstra, Mets. Best fielder | Willie McGee, Cardinals.

Right field | Tony Gwynn, Padres. 14 home runs, 59 RBIs, .329 batting average, .381 on-base percentage, .467 slugging percentage, 107 runs, 211 hits, 37 stolen bases. 2. Kevin Bass, Astros. Best fielder | Bass

Outfield | Eric Davis, Reds. 27 home runs, 71 RBIs, .277 batting average, .378 on-base percentage, .523 slugging percentage, 80 stolen bases.



Starting rotation |

1. Mike Scott, Astros.
18-10, 2.22 ERA, 306 strikeouts and 72 walks in 275.1 innings, five shutouts.

2. Rick Rhoden, Pirates. 15-12, 2.84 ERA, 159 strikeouts and 76 walks in 253.2 innings, 12 complete games.

3. Fernando Valenzuela, Dodgers. 21-11, 3.14 ERA, 242 strikeouts and 85 walks in 269.1 innings, 20 complete games, 13 wild pitches.

4. Bobby Ojeda, Mets. 18-5, 2.57 ERA, 148 strikeouts and 52 walks in 217.1 innings.

5. Ron Darling, Mets. 15-6, 2.81 ERA, 184 strikeouts and 81 walks in 237 innings. 6. Dwight Gooden, Mets. 7. Bill Gullickson, Reds. 8. Bob Knepper, Astros.

Reliever | Todd Worrell, Cardinals. 9-10, 2.08 ERA, 36 saves, 73 strikeouts and 41 walks in 103.2 innings. 2. Lee Smith, Cubs.
— Kevin Brewer