October 9, 1985

National League awards [1985]



Player-manager Pete Rose singled for his 4,192nd hit, breaking Ty Cobb’s all-time hits record. Nolan Ryan became first pitcher to 4,000 strikeouts. There was a two-day players’ strike on Aug. 6-7. Keith Hernandez, Dave Parker and Tim Raines testified at the Pittsburgh drug trials.

Babe Ruth Award | Dwight Gooden, Mets. 24-4, 1.53 ERA, 268 strikeouts and 69 walks in 276.2 innings, 16 complete games, eight shutouts. At 20 years old, Gooden won the pitching Triple Crown and had the lowest ERA since Bob Gibson. | Doctor K: Awesome And Then Some

2. Willie McGee, Cardinals
3. Pedro Guerrero, Dodgers
4. Tim Raines, Expos
5. Gary Carter, Mets
6. John Tudor, Cardinals

Walter Johnson Award | Dwight Gooden, Mets. He is the youngest 20-game winner of all time. | So Good, So Young

Jackie Robinson Award | Tom Browning, Reds. 20-9, 3.55 ERA, 155 strikeouts and 73 walks in 261.1 innings. 2. Vince Coleman, Cardinals.

Pee Wee Reese Award | Gary Carter, Mets. 32 home runs, 100 RBIs, .281 batting average, .365 on-base percentage, .488 slugging percentage. 2. Ozzie Smith, Cardinals.

Connie Mack Award | Whitey Herzog, Cardinals. 101-61 [.623]

2. Pete Rose, Reds
3. Davey Johnson, Mets



Catcher | Gary Carter, Mets. 32 home runs, 100 RBIs, .281 batting average, .365 on-base percentage, .488 slugging percentage. 2. Mike Scioscia, Dodgers. Best fielder | Tony Pena, Pirates.

First base | Keith Hernandez, Mets. 10 home runs, 91 RBIs, .309 batting average, .384 on-base percentage, .430 slugging percentage. 2. Mike Schmidt, Phillies. Best fielder | Hernandez

Second base | Tom Herr, Cardinals. 8 home runs, 110 RBIs, .302 batting average, .379 on-base percentage, .416 slugging percentage, 38 doubles, 31 stolen bases. Herr became the first player since 1950 with less than 10 home runs and more than 100 RBIs. Best fielder | Glenn Hubbard, Atlanta.

2. Ryne Sandberg, Cubs
3. Bill Doran, Astros

Third base | Tim Wallach, Expos. 22 home runs, 81 RBIs, .260 batting average, .310 on-base percentage, .450 slugging percentage, 36 doubles. Best fielder | Wallach

Shortstop | Ozzie Smith, Cardinals. 6 home runs, 54 RBIs, .276 batting average, .355 on-base percentage, .361 slugging percentage, 31 stolen bases. Best fielder | Smith

Left field | Tim Raines, Expos. 11 home runs, 41 RBIs, .320 batting average, .405 on-base percentage, .475 slugging percentage, 115 runs, 70 stolen bases, 13 triples.

Center field | Willie McGee, Cardinals. 10 home runs, 82 RBIs, .353 batting average, .384 on-base percentage, .503 slugging percentage, 114 runs, 214 hits, 56 stolen bases, 18 triples. McGee’s league-leading .353 average was the highest ever by a switch hitter. Best fielder | Eddie Milner, Reds. | McGee Whiz, He’s Having An MVP Year

2. Dale Murphy, Atlanta.

Right field | Dave Parker, Reds. 34 home runs, 125 RBIs, .312 batting average, .365 on-base percentage, .551 slugging percentage, 42 doubles.

Left fielder-third base | Pedro Guerrero, Dodgers. 33 home runs, 87 RBIs, .320 batting average, .422 on-base percentage, .577 slugging percentage. | A Bolt Out Of The Dodger Blue



Starting rotation |

1. Dwight Gooden, Mets.
24-4, 1.53 ERA, 268 strikeouts and 69 walks in 276.2 innings, 16 complete games, eight shutouts. He threw 49 consecutive innings without allowing an earned run from Aug. 31 to Oct 2.

2. John Tudor, Cardinals. 21-8, 1.93 ERA, 169 strikeouts and 49 walks in 275 innings, 14 complete games, 10 shutouts. Through May, Tudor was 1-7 with a 3.74 ERA. For the rest of the season, he was 20-1 with a 1.37 ERA.

3. Orel Hershiser, Dodgers. 19-3, 2.03 ERA, 157 strikeouts and 68 walks in 239.2 innings, five shutouts.

4. Rick Reuschel, Pirates. 14-8, 2.27 ERA, 138 strikeouts and 52 walks in 194 innings.

5. Fernando Valenzuela, Dodgers. 17-10, 2.45 ERA, 208 strikeouts and 101 walks in 272.1 innings, 14 complete games, five shutouts. He threw 41 consecutive innings without allowing an earned run to start the season. | Something Screwy Going On Here

Middle reliever | John Franco, Reds. 12-3, 2.18 ERA, 12 saves, 61 strikeouts and 40 walks in 99 innings. 2. Tim Burke, Expos.

Closer | Lee Smith, Cubs. 7-4, 3.04 ERA, 33 saves, 112 strikeouts and 32 walks in 97.2 innings. 2. Rich Gossage, Padres.
— Kevin Brewer

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